Game Review: Overlord

Sep. 22nd, 2017 12:07 am
green_knight: (Skyrim)
[personal profile] green_knight
[expanded from the review I posted on Steam]

Review and Discussion )


Bonus review-let: Forced.

Forced, Gamification of Games, Player vs. Designer )

So, yeah. I am learning something about gaming, game design, or myself from every game I play, and I am glad I seem to have broken through the mountain of shame (OMG, so much stuff I've never played, best never look at them) and guilt (OMG, so much wasted money). I no longer feel compelled to 'give every game a fair chance' just because I once spent money on it. (Frequently, in bundle deals, I did not even set out to buy all of the games.)

Overall, I spend less than £5/month on games and, overall, I enjoy gaming. I'm not going to get the same amount of fun out of every game, but if I can average a couple of hours of fun for every £5 I pay, that's actually not bad value for money.

US politics

Sep. 20th, 2017 09:33 am
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
Hope not Hate is coming to the US, to counter the rise of international hate groups. American friends, you can sign up here.

Humblebundle: Shadows of Mordor

Sep. 19th, 2017 08:56 pm
green_knight: (Skyrim)
[personal profile] green_knight
This remains one of my favourite games. I am nowhere near finishing it, and it's not an _easy_ game to play, but I love sneaking up on Uruk-hai and stabbing them in the back...

(The trick for this game is that you have to think in three dimensions: climbing up and jumping down are very much a part of it.)

It's the 'pay-what-you-want' bundle, so currently at $6.11 as I speak, and if you've been wanting to pick it up, now might be a good time.

Me? I'm bitter and twisted that the next offering will be Windows-only. (I seem to recall that Shadows of Mordor also took some time to be ported, so I still have hopes.)

And no, I would not pay $80 for a preorder - I have too many games to play - but still - I'd like to play Shadow of War eventually.

V&A, tamara

Sep. 18th, 2017 12:00 am
ruthi: a photograph of a dormouse eating a berry (Default)
[personal profile] ruthi
Today I went to the V&A,to see tamara, whom I had not seen in a while.


We took a tour that was especially for London Design Festival, so it took in several different installations, some of which are in conversation/reaction to pieces in the Museum. And because there were several different ones in different places and themes, the tour - and we - went over a wide range of the museum, from the Raphael galleries (where there were dancing robots!) to the glass galleries, the ceramics, furniture, via a gallery of paintings to see tapestries and a reaction to the tapestries, and to an opera display, and an installation of blue light and red light, so many things! It was about an hour and a half and had a lot of walking and climbing stairs and so on. "My fitbit will be happy", Tamara said.And so it was.
There were two guides, the one we got was called Dan Nuvo, (like the art, he said). He pinged gay (and then he made a skipping leg day joke and I was sure) and later in the Ceramics gallery he pointed out a display of a rainbow of glazes that was installed by a gay man, and said that he did the LGBT tour in the V&A, on the last Saturday of the Month at four, Derek do you want to go?

Anyway, the museum is huge and it was nice to see so much of it. And it was good to see tamara and do an thing with her.
We exited through Exhibition Road, there is a new! Shiny! entrance there that I had not seen before . I came in through the Cromwell road entrance. Then made her come and find me under the Chihuli chandelier.

After, we travelled together to Liverpool Street station, and met Nicole (or possibly another name, I am bad at names). She's doing comms for the concom. She was friendly and polite. Apparently she had slightly alarmed some police officers earlier by being friendly and polite at them. People don't seem to understand that in a big crowded city, ignoring people is the best way one can give them space.
cjwatson: (Default)
[personal profile] cjwatson

is mise bó
tá mé an-caoin
léigh mé an dán
ar idirlíon
nuair is mian leat
canaim amhrán
fanaim rómhall
lím an t-arán

for the confused )

TG Lurgan, amhráin as Gaeilge

Sep. 17th, 2017 08:16 pm
cjwatson: (Default)
[personal profile] cjwatson

Coláiste Lurgan (Lurgan College) is an Irish-language summer school in Connemara; it has a musical project called TG Lurgan which does lots of brilliant translated covers. Here are a couple, worth watching even if you have little or no Irish 'cause they're obviously having such a good time with it!

videos )

(I'd run across them before, but [twitter.com profile] eyebrowsofpower reminded me of them today.)

Trying to identify plant.

Sep. 17th, 2017 12:42 am
agoodwinsmith: (Default)
[personal profile] agoodwinsmith
http://agoodwinsmith.dreamwidth.org/file/420.jpg
http://agoodwinsmith.dreamwidth.org/file/863.jpg

Well, this just proves I don't know how to upload photos to Dreamwidth.

I'm now going to post this and see what I get.

Okay. With a modest amount of tweaking, the photos are available. We arrived too late to see this bloom. It has pea-like leaves and pea-like pods, but the pods are purple, and the seeds are teeny tiny brown beans (teeny tiny compared to the pod size). There are old stalks in the ground, showing that it was cut back to grow again, so it must be a perennial. There are better photos on facebook.

Edited 5:55 pm to add:

It is a Baptista Australis:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baptisia_australis

Good. *Next* year it gets a climbing cage.

(no subject)

Sep. 17th, 2017 02:14 am
ruthi: a photograph of a dormouse eating a berry (Default)
[personal profile] ruthi
On Saturday I went out to see "God's Own Country" which is also known around these parts as Brokeback Yorkshire. (These parts being both friends' brains and the internet).

I twote about it a couple of times after seeing it mentioned and seeing the trailer, and the director of the film and the producer of the film have both retweeted me.

There was much Yorkshire, and [personal profile] apiphile said it was "graphically farming and graphically gay" which is accurate.

(those mean there are scenes with dead animals in them, and there are scenes with pretty graphic gay sex)

*

I went to see Much Ado About Nothing at the Globe with Random, because she had a spare ticket. We had awful seats and then realised that where we were sitting was actually a continuation of the bench all the way to the wall, and the actual marked seats had a better view - we moved to the actual seats during the interval.
I liked the Beatrice, she was charming and funny. I also liked the bright costumes.

(I think I nodded off at one point, so still low energy/ not enough stamina for an play, but if I'm sitting down I can just do that and not be in anyone's way - and then I wake up and keep watching, I don't get the huge energyy drop from trying to stay standing up)

*

(Today I looked at the BBC iplayer website, and BBC Alba had Oran Na Mara/Song of the Sea - that beautiful animated film - available. But it is dubbed in language I do not understand - Scottich Gaelic, perhaps? and no English subtitles, either.
It's still very pretty.

*

I went looking through the iplayer films and they had Pedro Almodovar's 'I'm So Excited' Which is on an airplane that has a fault in its landing gear so instead of flying to Mexico is circling Toledo, waiting to get a place to land. It is full of sex and alcohol and drugs, some - especially the drugs - non-consensually, and it is very very silly. Everyone on economy is given 'muscle relaxants' and is fully asleep for the entire flight, for example. This is very very silly and also unethical and impossible. They all wake up fine for the landing and evacuation. This is also impossible. It's taking itself about as seriously as a eurovision song. Once I totally accepted that mindset, I enjoyed it. (Also there is a suicide attempt that is averted - person is about to, phone rings, they don't - but they are shown walking onto an ambulance, to be hospitalised).
The mood is light, there are bright colours, cheerfulness, and a happy ending.

*
green_knight: (Default)
[personal profile] green_knight
This is part 'moar spoons' and part displacement, but I've started to work through some of the assorted games I have, with the goal of at least touching each game for a bit and either enjoying them or ditching them altogether.

7 Mages
7 impossible moves before dinner )

And that's just the tutorial. Nope, nope, nopety nope.

Casual Games x4 )

Don't know what I'll play next, I'll probably burn through a number of casual/freebie games next week before going back to Skyrim.
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Reread.

Second book of Saunder's A Book of the Commonweal series (that's what's on the books, calling it a trilogy feels a bit weird, since I have vague recollections of a fourth book on the way). it takes plce not long after the events in the first book. I don't think it's ever explicit, but I'm thinking "weeks to a few months".

We're primarily following Edgar (occasionally just "Ed") who starts the book just waking up from a coma, feeling very weird indeed. And there's a really good reason for that. It turns out that Edgar has spent most of his life having his magical power completely consumed by a metaphysical (and probably also physical) parasite. And now it's been taken out because that's what you do with parasites. And now there's a problem, because Edgar is too old for traditional wizard training to work. But too powerful to not be trained, otherwise things like "death" (and occasionally "mayhem") happens.

And so an alternative is found. We follow Edgar and his fellow students through approximately the first year of training, learning more (much more) about how magic works, as well as how the Commonweal works.
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Reread.

This is Saunders' debut (as far as I'm aware) book. My recollection of this, when it came to re-read it, was "stuffs happened" and that was pretty much it. The book is... dense. Informationally speaking, that is. I can't, to be honest, tell you that I'm sure if the narrative voice is first person or just extremely tight third, but it's one, the other, or switching between those.

Anyway, this is a book set in the Commonweal. And, I hear you ask, what is one of those. Well, it would've been cool if there was an explanatory chapter, but there is't. So, as far as I have inferred, the Commonweal is the creation of the Wizard Laurel, about 500 years ago, as a general "I am so fed up" reaction to the last, what, several many thousands (hundreds of thousands, possibly) years of sorcerous rule (basic pattern: "magic user gets powerful, kills the previous ruler; mass sacrifices and brain squishing ensues", then repeat with the magic user from the previous sentence switched to the ruler position). So, the obvious solution is something that pretty much looks like representative democracy, with a heavy dose of enforced resource equality.

Now, some of that Commonweal information is gleaned from the next two books. Where was I? Oh, yes, as we start the book, it seems as if one of the neighbouring "we keep cycling through previous ruler and mass sacrifices" areas has decided that it is Really Time to enter the Commonweal, in force, and we get a first row seat to the experience of a small band of brave people trying to force the invaders back (or, as the case MAY be, keep them outside the border).

All in all, pretty good reading.
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Reread.

This is the third book in Sanderson's "first Mistborn trilogy" (there now seems to be ore than one, which is fine, I should try to remember looking into perhaps get hold of the first one). All in all, this is a series that plays on your expectations, but not in what I would consider a malicious way.

I did find it quite interesting to notice the things I did and did not remember from the first time I read the trilogy, there were vast chunks that had just left my mind, but other things were relatively as I expected. Memory says I last read this some 5-6 years ago.

[ bookmonth ] 2017-08

Sep. 16th, 2017 11:18 am
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Book list )

A linear extrapolation says 124.5 books by year's end. August was pretty much a miss in the "reads lots" department, with travel that was full of sufficiently interesting distractions that, well, this ain't just been a month for reading (also, perhaps, signalled by being about two week's late wit hte monthly summary).

Transition.

Sep. 15th, 2017 12:14 pm
agoodwinsmith: (Default)
[personal profile] agoodwinsmith
I have received my very last paycheque.

#amreading

Sep. 11th, 2017 11:45 pm
green_knight: (Default)
[personal profile] green_knight
I just finished - well, finished Saturday night after going to bed - Stephanie Burgis' Snowspelled, which I thoroughly enjoyed, with a big fat caveat: its (perceived-by-me) weaknesses seem very much intended. This is a short book - not much beyond novella length - and it's very clearly influenced by Genre Romance, though that is not the main focus.

This is an alternate Regency story, with lots of magic and interesting politics and a main character who messed up her life really badly and now has to come to terms with that failure. And who _then_ stumbles into a political intrigue of great urgency which has to take precedence over her personal challenges. It's well-written, amusing, has characters you want to hang out with because they are _nice people_, and an interesting magic system. (Through absolutely no fault of its own it clashed a little with the Fey *I* am writing about, but for the duration of the book, I could put that aside.)

'Why, despite keeping me up beyond midnight, this is not my kind of book )

So if you like alternate regencies, particularly one where women DO worry about politics, this is an enjoyable offering. I'll probably pick up the next one, but I don't think I will reread it too often, and I don't intend to buy it in paperback.
kaberett: a patch of sunlight on the carpet, shaped like a slightly wonky heart (light hearted)
[personal profile] kaberett
you might also like Heartstopper, an LGBT comic about a British grammar school, which I have just inhaled this evening after one of you all reblogged it on the tumbls xx

(comment I left on the Patreon: 3-2 came across my dash earlier this evening, I have just read EVERYTHING (with laughing-out-loud and misting-up and making-my-partner-read-bits), thank you *so much* for this. -- I am 27, I was in Year 9 when Section 28 was repealed, I was the only out queer in my secondary school of 1000+ students, and I recognise these crushes SO HARD. Thank you so, so much for making this be a thing in the world, and I am really looking forward to reading more. <3)

A debris field

Sep. 11th, 2017 02:11 am
sci_starborne: Sign of the Fox (Default)
[personal profile] sci_starborne
I had intended to purposefully avoid relationships for the foreseeable future, as I feel I do not value my own desires enough and so I ignore them in relationships, breeding resentment. It is not anothers responsibility to draw that out of me.

What desires do I even have? I feel dead.

I feel embarassed that some months back, despite this I flirted with a friend of mine because I thought they were attracted to me. I think myself so inherently worthless that I cannot pass up any chance for a relationship, because what are the odds someone else will want me. No matter how bad it might be.

I feel old. I feel guilty for finding people younger than me attractive. I justify it by the rationale that relationships with notable age differences are ripe ground for abuses of power from relative levels of life experience, income or personal utility as well as life goals. But as someone who has always been introspective, learning more than most from experiences, who for his age is of limited utility, income and maintains a close connection to current events, I wonder if I'm not just using it as an excuse to avoid people thinking I'm some sort of predator.

I feel miserable. I do not currently have the capacity to feel emotional investment in anyone. Every learnt-response to go to someone in pain is now fear and revulsion. Every bit in the last few months has been painfully forced. I wonder how this would combine with my inability to form long-term relationships anyway.

I was always told it's what's inside someone that counts. And I still beleive it, but it makes me feel guilty for not finding men attractive. Knowing so many people in varying stages of transitioning between sexes is helping determine what it is about someone that makes them appear attractive to me and how much of it is gendered.

My sense of attraction is fragmented. I'm attracted to styles, expressiveness, personalities and certain physical characteristics. But they are all seperate. One or another, never together. And as such it feels shallow and broken. I do not currently know how to bring them together.

Fine Art and Kitsch.

Sep. 9th, 2017 12:07 pm
agoodwinsmith: (Default)
[personal profile] agoodwinsmith
We unpacked all the "pictures" and hung some of them yesterday.

It is amazing how even having some of them up makes it feel like we're staying instead of just camping.

Some of the pieces are originals from the student art sale at Emily Carr University (held every year in November you should go), and some are prints, and some are tacky things in gold frames. :)

It is also extremely excellent to get rid of the cardboard and bubble wrap and tissue paper and and and. It's all out on the deck, so that's a bit unsightly, but hey - one thing at a time.

In other news: we are getting the most excellent rain today. It has been hot and dry for 8 or more weeks, thick with smoke (you can't see across the valley, and sometimes a hanging grey veil between us and the mobiles across the street). The rain is that steady soaking cleansing rain, and the air smells sooooo good.

Voynich mss: a solution?

Sep. 8th, 2017 03:56 pm
green_knight: (Writing tradition)
[personal profile] green_knight
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/voynich-manuscript-solution/

offers an interesting explanation for the 'mysterious cypher' that makes up the text of the mss. I want to see an actual translation/transcription before I form a final opinion, but it seems at least somewhat plausible.

(The mss is available in PDF form from a number of sources, for instance here)
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